SEARCH PROJECTS BY AUTHOR

SEARCH PROJECTS BY LOCATION

URBAN DESIGN PROJECTS

URBAN ANALYSIS PROJECTS

FLOOD INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS

SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING PROJECTS

MULTIPLE-UNIT HOUSING PROJECTS

PUBLIC BUILDING PROJECTS

LANDSCAPE PROJECTS

ABOUT

NEWS

CONTACT

 
Amphibious House
Breeze House
EcoMOD2: preHAB
Floating House
Home Values
Housing New Orleans
L9 Pilaft, Suburban Germination
Louisiana LIFThouse Initiative
New Orleans Housing Prototype
New Orleans: Wading In
Retrofitting the Rancher
Say Yoo-Hoo to the Bungalette
Tarpon House
Three Foot Eleven
Trailers in a Block
URBANbuild
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
<prev  1  2  3  next>
     
title   Say Yoo-Hoo to the Bungalette
student   Lee Ping Kwan
instructor   Laurie Hawkinson
date   Spring 2006
school   Columbia University
     
subject   single family housing
site   New Orleans
     
description  
This design for a storm-proof cottage refers to traditional moveable housing units such as the trailer. Sitting atop pontoons, and, therefore, potentially floatable, the house takes into account the likelihood of flooding in New Orleans. Constructed of prefabricated panels, it is supported by an armature of scaffolding. Cisterns collect rainwater and a filtration system treats gray water to produce clean water for household use. In addition, solar cells on the roof collect the sunís energy to provide electric power, also helping to make this visionary house self-sufficient and ecologically sustainable.
     
link   studio booklet (pdf)
school site
     
comments  

01/31/07
Karen Keefer
San Mateo, CA

Having seen much destruction caused by all types of disasters in my 27 years working for FEMA, the description of the Bungalette seems the smartest approach to single-family housing proposed in Project New Orleans. Some suggestions for further improvements, as well as for use throughout the USA:
1. Tether it to a strong piling (or tree), so that it won't float away
2. Make it round to lessen impact of wind and also allow floating debris to go around it.
3. Construct with panels made by compressing agricultural bi-products, bent into round shape and fastened together on site, then sprayed with elasticized enamel or some impervious material to keep indestructable by flood, hail, termites, mold, rot, earthquakes, etc. (See www.villacasa.com)
4. Ensure quick and simple set up (4-8 hours per house).
5. Keep all construction costs low (i.e., $25K to $50K). FEMA's mobile home costs from purchase, moving, set up, etc. are up to $150K/unit. And these units are considered "temporary housing",whereas your design can be permanent.
Good luck!!



3/13/08
Karen
New Orleans, LA

Why did you use a photo of a man getting frisked by the cops?



add your own comments  by completing the fields below
 

your name:

your email (not required):

your location:

 

your comments:


     (comments will appear within 24 hours)