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Claiborne Stitch
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Dryades/Oretha Haley Castle Corridor Study: Central City New Orleans
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Environments of Design: New Orleans Now: The Temporary City: Municipal
          Vulnerability to Population Displacement

Environments of Design: New Orleans Now: Will Small Businesses Survive?
Expandable Prototypes for Public Schools in Post Katrina New Orleans:
          Schools within School Prototype:
          Can Competition Yield Cooperation?

Exposing New Orleans
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Inhabiting the Fluid Terrain: Meandering Through Sponges
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Mobilizing the Community to Integrate Ecology, Open Space Resources, and
          Disaster Resistance in a Post-Katrina 9th Ward

New Canals Needed
New Orleans Is Intoxicated Urbanism
New Orleans Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan
New Orleans: The Next Tax-Free Haven?
A New Urban Fabric: New Orleans Jazz
Recovery Planning Methodology
St. Roch Market, Documentation and Rehabilitation Study
Sites of Memory
Topographic Demography
Tulane/Gravier Master Plan
URBANbuild
We Are All Players in the NOLA Game
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
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title   URBANbuild
students   Sam Applebaum, Jared Bowers, Stephanie Day, Robert Deacon, Dave Demsey,
Williston Dye, Mark Enlow, Tyler Hutcherson, Kim Mayhall, Adam Porter, David Salkin, Jennifer
Good Zurik, Claire Cahan, Mike Dutullio, Jason Heinze, Matt Hux, Maggie Joyce, Andrea Patrick,
Carlos Sanchez, Heather Skeehan, Emilie Taylor, Ben Wasserman, Sam Welty, Daniel Zangara
instructors   Alan Lewis, Byron Mouton
date   Spring 2006
school   Tulane University
     
subject   urban analysis, single family housing
site   Treme, Lafitte
     
description  
Tulane’s URBAN build program is a strategy that approaches urban design at both the smaller scale of the individual lot and the larger scale of the community context. With the support of a HUD COPC grant received in the fall of 2005 and in association with community nonprofits, students in the School of Architecture design and build affordable housing prototypes in New Orleans neighborhoods. The first prototype is sited at 1930 Dumaine in the upper Tremé neighborhood; it was completed in the summer of 2006. Under the terms of the grant, three additional projects in different neighborhoods will be undertaken over a two-year period.
Students in the URBANbuild “macro” studio study the larger urban context of the selected house lot to explore progressive alternatives for a neighborhood plan. They work to incorporate green spaces as well as mixed-density housing, which includes single-family and multi-unit residential structures, and mixed-use commercial and institutional buildings.
Students in the URBANbuild “micro” studio study traditional New Orleans’ housing to design prototypes that reinterpret the city’s architectural heritage in a fresh way. They work to incorporate such communal aspects as the porch and its focus on interaction with life on the street. They also analyze traditional as well as newer methods of construction and building materials to produce environmentally sustainable and adaptable designs. The first prototype built at 1930 Dumaine, for example, is a wood frame structure on masonry piers that can be reproduced with variations to accommodate multi-generational, multi-family, or live/work spaces.
     
link   project site
     
comments  

6/23/08
Denise Bickham
College Station, PA

No comment, just a question: My house in the 1500 block of St. Roch Ave in New Orleans needs to be raised. My question is, is there any new methods of raising a house on concrete piers that will allow the house to move up a few more feet by the push of a level or button when needed and that would not cost over $30,000. dollars?



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