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The Brewery Pod
Dryades/Oretha Haley Castle Corridor Study: Central City New Orleans
Higher Ground: Rebuilding the Lower 9th
Hybridization: Programmatic Reorganization
Hydropolis
Inter-Living System
Liquid Urbanism: The New New Orleans
Mega Medical City: MCLNO
The Metropolis as the Machine in the Garden
Museum of Food and Drink (MoFaD)
A Neighborhood Square for Gentilly
New Canals Needed
New Orleans Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan
New Orleans: The Next Tax-Free Haven?
NOLA-Urbanator
Rebuilding the Houma Nation
Recovery Planning Methodology
Sea Level: Balancing New Orleans
Singing a New Tune
Tulane/Gravier Master Plan
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
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title   Higher Ground: Rebuilding the Lower 9th
student   Jonathan Imler
instructors   Coleman Jordan, Michael Sorkin
date   Spring 2006
school   University of Michigan
     
subject   urban design
site   Ninth Ward
     
description  
Subscribing to the “high density on high ground” philosophy, this plan aims to create more high ground in the Lower Ninth Ward by raising the ground plane of the entire neighborhood. Land berms that incorporate a concrete modular system provide elevated sites for building as well as drainage pockets underneath them. The project also proposes the use of 12-foot high steel structures upon which new housing can be built. A schematic zoning plan for the neighborhood includes a proposed grocery store, which is an important focus of the scheme.
     
link   studio site model (pdf)
school site
     
comments  

01/18/07
Rozy Shrestha
Kathmandu, Nepal

This is one of the best ways of dealing with site, and handling the project.


09/26/07
Ryan Stoddard
New Orleans, LA

Good design, but it would never fly here due to economic conditions. I just moved here from Jacksonville to work as a civil engineer and it is astounding what level of design standards they have. I think parts of the city should be dug out and used for fill to raise other parts and create detention areas for stormwater instead of relying on miles of storm networks to be pumped out into the lake. The distances cause frictional losses and hours of flooding for everyday rain events. Detention areas would both treat runoff and alleviate localized flooding while providing fill material to raise low areas. Great concept though. Look up "Atlantis Raintank" also for a similar system to what you propose.



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