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The Brewery Pod
Dryades/Oretha Haley Castle Corridor Study: Central City New Orleans
Higher Ground: Rebuilding the Lower 9th
Hybridization: Programmatic Reorganization
Hydropolis
Inter-Living System
Liquid Urbanism: The New New Orleans
Mega Medical City: MCLNO
The Metropolis as the Machine in the Garden
Museum of Food and Drink (MoFaD)
A Neighborhood Square for Gentilly
New Canals Needed
New Orleans Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan
          Lambert/Danzey Plan

New Orleans: The Next Tax-Free Haven?
NOLA-Urbanator
Rebuilding the Houma Nation
Recovery Planning Methodology
Sea Level: Balancing New Orleans
Singing a New Tune
A Strategy for Rebuilding New Orleans
          Urban Land Institute (ULI)

Tulane/Gravier Master Plan
The Unified New Orleans Plan (UNOP)
 
 
 
 
 
   
    <prev  1  next>
     
title   New Orleans Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan
project teams   District 2 - Cliff James / Byron Stewart
District 3 - Billes Architecture
District 4 - Zyscovich, Inc., Cliff James / Byron Stewart
District 5 - Bermello, Ajamil & Partners, Inc. / Villavaso & Associates, LLC.
District 6 - Hewitt - Washington Architectss
District 7 - St. Martin - Brown & Associates, LLP
District 8 - Stull and Lee Architects
District 9 - St. Martin - Brown & Associates, LLP
District 10 - St. Martin - Brown & Associates, LLP
District 11 - St. Martin - Brown & Associates, LLP
project managers   Lambert Advisory LLC ,
SHEDO LLC,
GCR,
Dr. Silas Lee & Assoc.
date   Fall 2006
     
subject   urban design, urban analysis
site   District 1 - Central Business District, French Quarter
District 2 - Central City, Milan
District 3 - Hollygrove, Dixon, Leonidas, Marlyville/Fountainbleau, Broadmoor, Freret, Audubon
District 4 - Mid-city, Bayou St. John, Tulane/Gravier, BW Cooper, Gertown, Treme, Lafitte, Seventh Ward,
        Fairgrounds, St. Bernard, Iberville
District 5 - Lakeview, West End, Navarre, City Park, Lake Shore, Lake Vista, Lake Wood
District 6 - Fillmore, St. Anthony, Milneburg, Pontchartrain Park, Gentilly Woods, Gentilly Terrace, Dillard,
        Lake Terrace, Lake Oaks
District 7 - St. Claude, St. Roch, Desire, Florida
District 8 - Lower Ninth Ward, Holy Cross
District 9 - Little Woods, Pine Village, West Lake Forest, Plum Orchard, Read Blvd East, Read Blvd West
District 10 - Village de L'est
District 11 - Viavant, Venetian Isles
     
description  
Plan Release Date: September 23, 2006
Funding Agency: New Orleans City Council (with unused CDBG money)
cost: $2.974 Million

With BNOB drawing increased public skepticism, the City Council announced on April 7th, 2006, that they had hired a team led by Miami-based housing consultant Paul Lambert and Sheila Danzey of New Orleans to draw up plans for 46 Orleans Parish neighborhoods that were significantly flooded by Katrina.[1] This new process was christened the New Orleans Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan (NOLANRP), but is commonly given the eponymous title the “Lambert Plan”. The funding for this process came from $2.9 million in leftover CDBG funds for an earlier, pre-Katrina project.

Lambert and Danzey assigned teams of architects and planners to multiple neighborhoods using the district boundaries established by the Bring New Orleans Back Commission. Most districts were assigned a single planning team (the exception being Planning District 4 where neighborhoods were divided between two teams). Hiring decisions were made with little public input, and the neighborhood boundaries used often did not line up with informal boundaries understood by active neighborhood associations, causing public skepticism from the outset. Despite continuing confusion about the process itself and whether it would be considered complete enough to satisfy funding requirements, 46 separate plans were drafted and finalized by September 23, 2006.[2] The process involved 84 published meetings (including three in Houston, Atlanta, and Baton Rouge) and, according to Lambert, the participation of 7,500 residents city-wide.
     
link   project site
     
comments  

01/29/07
Brendan Nee
Berkeley, CA

Last semester, my friend (Jed Horne) and I did an independent study through our urban planning graduate school program at University of California, Berkeley. Come check out our webpage. It includes our analysis of the Lambert Plans.

http://www.nolaplans.com/



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