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The Brewery Pod
Dryades/Oretha Haley Castle Corridor Study: Central City New Orleans
Higher Ground: Rebuilding the Lower 9th
Hybridization: Programmatic Reorganization
Hydropolis
Inter-Living System
Liquid Urbanism: The New New Orleans
Mega Medical City: MCLNO
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New Orleans Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan
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Tulane/Gravier Master Plan
 
 
 
 
 
   
   
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title   Mega Medical City: MCLNO
designer   Alec Ng
principal   n/a
date   Spring 2004
firm   n/a
     
subject   urban design
site   Tulane/Gravier, Central Business District
     
description  
Towards the new century of health care development, hospital infrastructure becomes one of the most critical and challenging development in our society. After the destructions caused by “Katrina”, people demands for new improvements from the existing health care system in New Orleans and the city’s aging hospitals. When a disaster occurs in a city, the hospital facilities become the most important building structures that not only act as the shelters and protection for people, but also the upfront defense mechanisms toward the disastrous situation. Its urban setting and structural design must have the ability to withstand any impact caused by a natural or artificial disaster.
The proposed Mega Medical City [MMC] aims to merge, combine and mix the current hospital facilities within the New Orleans city into one primary medical hub. This design includes both the Tulane University hospital as well as the Charity Hospital. The elevated [above flood plane] mega structure will be built across highway 10 and it will be expanded across 5 city blocks in order to accommodate the high volume of medical needs. The MMC is intended to become the shopping mall for medical needs in the city. Hospitals will no longer be widely dispersed but will be concentrated in one central area to provide all the healthcare services to people. The structure consists of 4 essential elements 1] Elevated Urban Plate, 2] Urban Forest, 3] Transportation connecting hub [Horizontal / Vertical] and 4] Programmable medical building block. These 4 elements will compress together to generate a multi level medical building matrix which will be inter-connected with each other across the urban block. There will be no separation between different hospitals, but a united medical center that is dedicated to the people of New Orleans.
     
link   n/a
     
comments  

2/03/07
M. Ballin
La Crosse, WI

A Mega proposal seems right, for the medical realm. The longterm rescue in a below sea level place should have an above flood level bench mark to act as a safe haven and post disaster zone. A medical community with back up power etc, seems rational. The Mega Structure aspect (Reyner Banham) seems like a good route in Post-Katrina New Orleans. Paolo Soleri's proposal seems similar and would moor the city and the Mississippi River.



12/19/06
Sharon Yau
Los Angeles, CA

A central location for all medical needs is a great idea. Presently, different hospitals sometimes specialize in different illnesses, people frequently get transferred from one facility to another. Some of these hospitals may be very equipped but others may lack labor, machinery and other medical amenities & services. If all of the medical professionals and services can be available under one roof, it will be much more convenient for patients.



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